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What makes cities tick? GenslerOnCities explores the planning, design, and the potential futures of urban landscapes.

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Wednesday
Aug112010

Welcome to Loop U

Given that my office shares a building with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, my perspective may be somewhat skewed. But any time you head to the park for lunch, hop on the El, or just walk down State Street, it’s hard to shake the feeling that you’re back in college.

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Tuesday
Aug102010

3 Steps to Carbon Neutral Airports: Step 2

Editor’s note: this is the third post of a three-part series. The first post, outlining opportunities to reduce the amount of energy that airports use, appears here; the second post, stressing the importance of using on-site, clean, renewable energy, appears here.

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Wednesday
Jul282010

Parents Missing Opportunity to Improve Learning through Design

The results of the latest BCSE teachers’ survey confirm first-hand perceptions of education and design professionals across the UK: school environments have a significant impact on pupil behaviour. However, the benefits of good learning environments are not recognised by most parents.  The reason for this missed opportunity is simple: parents aren’t aware of the learning benefits design offers.

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Wednesday
Jul212010

Inside View of SCUP

Insights from Madeline Burke-Vigeland on the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) 2010 Annual Conference

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Thursday
Jul152010

Shanghai Tower Construction Update

Shanghai Tower

Shanghai Tower is a super-tall building currently under construction in Shanghai's Pudong district. It broke ground in November 2008, and it's on schedule for completion in 2014. The surprising thing? It's yet to rise above the ground. So: what's going on in that enormous hole in the ground? Technical Director Dick Fencl and Project Architect Howe Keen Foong offer their insights, including noting that the giant circular form above isn't a hole; it's a slurry wall. And it's temporary. Here's the story behind it.

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