About GenslerOnWork

GenslerOnWork examines the modern workplace and how design can help us become more engaged and productive as we earn our livings.

Search GenslerOn
Work Topics
Connect with Us

Entries in Workplace Research (28)

Friday
Jul082016

How Can the Workplace Impact Innovation?

Image © Gensler

Gensler’s U.S. Workplace Survey 2016 is the latest in a series that builds on over a decade of workplace research. We started our journey in 2005 by uncovering a link between a better designed work environment and performance. In every subsequent survey, we have tried to peel back the layers of comprehension—to understand why, and how, workplace makes an impact. Through the years, we have uncovered how people work, and we’ve found that effective workplace design links to higher business performance. In our 2013 survey, we discovered that choice drives performance and innovation. That finding really intrigued us and led to this year’s research question—how can the physical workplace environment impact innovation?

Click to read more ...

Friday
Jul012016

A Creative Downtown L.A.: Gensler Introduces Downtown’s First Vertical Urban Creative Campus

Image © Gensler

It’s hard for many of us at Gensler Los Angeles to believe that we are about to hit our five year anniversary of moving into our offices in the heart of Downtown L.A. Being a part of the tremendous resurgence of Downtown has provided our entire team with inspiration, energy and a renewed sense of civic pride. Our presence has inspired so many of our employees to relocate, commuting on foot and on public transit, walking to client meetings and volunteering our time to make Downtown L.A. a better place.

Click to read more ...

Thursday
Jun232016

Design: A Conduit for Learning and Innovation

Image © Gensler

We are in an era of unprecedented volume of information, but information is of little value until it is distilled into useful, applicable knowledge. Distilling that information deluge takes a mindset focused on learning and exploration. Given this challenge, and the number of distractions and interruptions that occur in both the virtual and the physical work environment, we have recognized the need to consider new models of working and experimenting that more effectively support learning and knowledge transfer.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
May182016

Introverts Rejoice! The Rise of the Fifth Work Mode

Cozy hideouts such as this one support an emerging work mode that's proving critical to helping workers recharge their batteries: Rejuvenate. Image © Garrett Rowland

When Gensler published the US and UK Workplace Research Studies in 2008, the findings helped quantify the power of people and place to drive profit in knowledge economy companies. The findings indicated that top-performing companies design workplaces capable of supporting all four work modes: Focus, Collaborate, Learn, and Socialize. They also found that knowledge workers are constantly shifting in and out of each of these work modes throughout the business day. Activity-based work settings, or the ability to select an environment that matches your work mode rather than relying on a one-size-fits-all approach, has now become a widely accepted tenet of workplace design.

Click to read more ...

Friday
Dec042015

Good Design Alone Won’t Eradicate Mindless Meetings 

Image © Wendy Andrew-Doele

Most of our recent workplace designs have dramatically increased the amount of meeting space available to the client. This happens not only because our clients usually ask for such increases, but our utilization studies tend to substantiate the need for more meeting areas. In many ways, building a case for more meeting spaces in the modern (frequently more open) workplace is easy. Yet there is a larger underlying question that goes beyond simple space issues: what type of a collaborative culture is an organization trying to foster? More cool and tech enabled meeting rooms are usually a good thing, but more meetings are usually not. In the research we do—the surveys, focus groups, interviews and other studies—a typical refrain is that there are too many meetings and many meetings are “a waste of time.”

Click to read more ...